As this journey has been moving forward, I have found myself thinking about what it really means to be a blogger and possibly hold an office that has traditionally not been part of or held by one who operates in this arena of church or culture.  I have found myself over-analyzing my "next more" in trying to balance the weight of each post with the need to blog with enough authenticity so as to not turn this this blog into one-way information conduit.  I am also trying to honor the discomfort some have with the very nature of blogging that, in some ways, makes people feel like there is unfair "exposure" of one candidate over another.   All valid concerns, but in the end, I will be who I be, nothing more nothing less.

I do understand there is a genuine need and usefulness to this blog
being a place where folks can find out about me and what I believe, but
most important is the place should be a place that sparks conversations
and interaction.

So as we enter the final two months of this moderator adventure, I am going to turn it up a notch and see if we can get some more good conversations going about all kinds of things, so that if the movement of the Spirit has me elected Moderator or not, we will have created a visible movement and that cannot be ignored.

But I do need some help.  One of my HUGE problems is that I am never short and ideas and thoughts.  I pretty much think everything is bloggable.  Not good.  Here are just a topics that have been rolling around in my head . . .

  • ON RELEVANCE: Are we really relevant?  All the resolutions we pass, the arguments we have, the energy we put into fighting each other and making grand statements, does any of it really matter?  Do we need to take a realistic look at our own sphere of influence in order to figure out what to do in order to be influential? 
    Possible titles: "Our own delusions of grandeur" or "The danger of believing our own hype"
  • ON YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTS: When we say we want youth and young adults in the church or that we want to ensure a church for future generations, do we really know what that will mean?  I think we are so stuck in "methods" of doing church that we have lost the ability to actually articulate the more vague "values" of being church.  Also, are those of us in the church now really prepared to usher in a church where folks do/will connect with God in different ways than we do?
    Possible Titles: "The simple complexities of a generation" "Putting young adults in a box to our own demise"
  • ON HOPE AND THE FUTURE: I think we like to live in an atmosphere of fighting.  We know exactly how to operate in a culture of fear and suspicion.  Not that conflict and tensions will or should be avoided or resolved, but what if the discourse had a foundation of hope and new life?  What does that look like when a group of people truly begins with an understanding that we, as a body, are trying to discern together the will of God?
    Possible Titles: "Oh No, optimism as broken out" or "What to do with hope."
  • ON PEOPLE: Some have accused me of just wanting everyone to play nice, hold hands, sing Kum Bay Yah and all get along.  While I am not averse to the occasional campfire group hug, I am in no way a pollyanna when it comes to conflict.  But then what do we do with the diversity in which people choose to engage in the debate?
  • OTHER THINGS: I have also thought about posting on church planting, the future of profession clergy, seminary training, dying churches, urban ministry, global mission, mission giving trends, racial/ethnic issues, etc.

Any intrigue you?  Are
there other topics or questions that you think would be good?  You care
to take a stab at any of them?  I am in the midst of finishing up my questions that will go out to GA commissioners, but drop me a comment or eMail and let me know what other topics you think needs to be lifted up.  If you have already posting something, let me know that as well and I’ll either use it as a jumping off place and/or it may get others engaged on your blog.

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