My 2011 Twitter Year in Review

Next in line for my “year in review” posts . . . Twitter.*

As I traveled back through a year full of tweets I was struck by how much I tweet. I know that some folks have unfollowed me because I tweet too much or tweet about certain things too often, but hey, as my twitter profile says, ” . . . i tweet a lot.” 30,000 Tweets here I come!

I was also struck by how quickly the memories came flooding back: where I was sitting, who was around me, how I was feeling and what was going on in the world. Trying to find one for each month was just not going to happen, so I decide to give a few for each month: T = Thoughtful, S = Sassy and R = Random. If you click on the OT, it will take you to the Original Tweet where you can reply or retweet as you please.

JANUARY

  • T – During times of violence and grief, there is a fine line between voicing righteous indignation and fanning the flames of hatred. [OT]
  • S – To make my schedule look more inviting, I’m contemplating referring to my “meetings” as “caffeinated relationship building opportunities.”  [OT]
  • R – When we told the girls to cover everything in the car that people might want to steal, “Should we cover our Pillow Pets?” #toocute [OT]

FEBRUARY

  • T - Do progressive and conservative Christians see faith so differently, that we might be better off looking at our conversations as interfaith? [OT]
  • S - With all due respect to the great orators in the room, sometimes leadership is seen not by your words, but your ability to restrain them. [OT]
  • R - Sometimes I have no idea what other people are talking about. I suspect I am not the only one. [OT]

MARCH

  • T - For those who are able to see uncertainty as a gift, the gift isn’t actually uncertainty, but the luxury and privilege to see it as such. [OT]
  • S - Sometimes I wonder if the church’s talk of radical “change” w/o doing so has now become the new status quo. Okay, I don’t really wonder. [OT]
  • R - You better be walking someone through a heart transplant operation if you are talking on your phone while using the urinal. Gross. [OT]

APRIL

  • T - Evil “wins” when we allow the overwhelming nature of the world’s suffering to convince us that our actions cannot make a difference.  [OT]
  • S - When I’m tempted to sling scripture like ninja stars at those who disagree w/me, I remember how much I LOVE IT when they are headed my way. [OT]
  • R - OH in regards to epic rap battles: “Mozart would totally kick Justin Bieber’s a$$!” [OT]

MAY

  • T - Wanting a unified voice is great, as long as we remember that a lack of dissention often leads to the marginalization of the voiceless. [OT]
  • S - When it comes to being community, there is a fine line between being a prophet in your own “hometown” and just being an jerk. [OT]
  • R - After 11+ years as their pastor, two months of goodbyes and a really lazy morning, time to get ready for my final Sunday evening w/@mbcc. [OT]

JUNE

  • T - If theological and political conversations do not deepen our understandings of one another’s humanity, honestly, I am not interested. [OT]
  • S – I use a disproportionate amount of my Jedi skills evicting people from seats near power outlets, “This is not the table that you seek.” [OT]
  • R - I never feel more like an entitled spoiled brat than when I find myself getting so FRUSTRATED over slow and intermittent internet access. [OT]

JULY

  • T - On this July 4th, I’m thankful for this nation where we can passionately and openly debate the very nature of what it means to be patriotic. [OT]
  • S - While I understand why the Prosperity Gospel is attractive, that is no excuse for any church to preach it. IMNSHO. [OT]
  • R - “Cool Whip, the duct tape of dessert toppings!” [OT]

AUGUST

  • T - Where Americanism and Christianity split is believing that one’s own survival and success leads the way to dignity and justice for all. [OT]
  • S - Would love to hear a #Irene news lead-in, “We’ve decided to report from inside the studio and not unnecessarily put our people at risk.” [OT]
  • R – Having the kind of morning when everyone sounds like Charlie Brown’s teacher.  [OT]

SEPTEMBER

  • T - As Georgia prepares to execute #troydavis. . . helplessness in the face of injustice is where many of us sit this night.  [OT]
  • S - Love when people accuse parents of “indoctrinating” their children with certain values . . . Um, I think that’s actually called “parenting.” [OT]
  • R - Some smooth lyricist should write, “It’s the end of the church as we know it.” And, yep . . . I feel fine. [OT]

OCTOBER

  • T - Most churches can’t be all things to all people, but I best most churches could be more things to more people if they wanted to be. [OT]
  • S - Amazed at how suddenly San Francisco can cool down . . . me thinks the naked dude that I saw this am might soon regret today’s “outfit.” [OT]
  • R - I know there are ideological differences, but at some level, shouldn’t Tea Party folks be outraged by what’s happening to Occupy folks? [OT]

NOVEMBER

  • T - I’m amazed at the ways we compartmentalize Jesus, for his radicality rests in the way he harmonizes being prophet, pastor, priest and poet. [OT
  • S - If San Francisco Propositions A and H both pass we’ll be saying, “Sure, we’ll fund public schools . . . as long as they are segregated.” [OT]
  • R - In order to stand in solidarity with future generations, I now think email is passe, so I may or may not get back to you.  [OT]

DECEMBER

  • T - The church will never be on the forefront of change if it takes so long for us to change that we arrive just in time to be behind again. [OT]
  • S - Dear lady sitting RIGHT next to me, I know we all pass gas, but lifting up a cheek, discharging at me w/o nary an “excuse me” is not okay.  [OT]
  • R- You might be the “spell check generation” if you have no confidence in your spelling without the presence or absence of a red squiggly line. [OT]

Whew! That’s a lot of  140 characters chunks of life. For those who have followed, retweeted, mentioned and/or replied to be in 2011, thank you. I can’t wait to see what 2012 offers!

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14 comments

  • David  

    Although, I have to say I like your idea Bruce. It’s a step in the right direction. It is just hard to not get a sense of impending despair when I think about the next season of my life. 

    • Bruce Reyes-Chow  

      Yes, I have heard this from many folks. Prob nothing to say to offer peace other than there are folks trying to break the cycle.

  • Brekke El  

    The Church also needs to look seriously at student debt – especially when it’s asking students to take on debt to be trained to serve the Church  and then not having jobs available for students who successfully complete this training. Even moderate debt (in my case, just cost of living fees) can be such a burden that it keeps me from being able to fully consider low-paying opportunities. In addition to develop these low-cost, part-time opportunities (which I think are great!) we as the Church need to be prayerful about how much debt we ask our students to go into.  This is another factor which will drive wonderfully gifted young(ish) people away from ministry jobs and into other sectors which will pay down their debts (speaking from experience). Edit: to Add – for those of us who are in the pre-family stages of life, with the most flexibility and capacity to move – not having options about income and debt means that the Church can’t take advantage of our energy and focus. How can we use these alternative models to the full benefit of young seminarians who are in the most flexible stage of life? We’re the most adaptable, I’d love to see how we can try new things in the Church!

    • David  

      We are the most adaptable but this debt also keeps us from getting married and starting families. And let’s face it churches are prejudiced against hiring single people.

  • David  

    Agreed

    • Bruce Reyes-Chow  

      You are not alone in this situation as I have heard from many. There are so many disconnects between denominations, seminaries, funding, cpm, etc. There is plenty of blame/responsibility to go around. I do think that folks are beginning to get the gravity of the situation, but there will not be much relief for folks in the short term. I will not try to give any false hope, only that there are significant conversations going on like none before.

      • David  

        Sorry I accidentally deleted that post while editing it. Basically, this system has left me broke and jobless. It is by it’s nature unjust.

      • David  

        We spend so much time debating about WHO gets to be part of this process we do not ask if this is a process we would want ANYONE to be a part of.

      • Brekke El  

        I don’t want to point my finger and say someone else is responsible for my debt. I chose to go to graduate school. But, I do think it’s important that the Church understand how this kind of debt will (can/does) cripple the opportunities that young seminarians face as they emerge from graduate study. It can frustrate otherwise enthusiastic young people with fresh ideas of ways to be the Body of Christ.

        I am particularly heartened by the possibility of getting health insurance through the denomination, since that is a MASSIVE drain on income and resources. This could definitely free up young people to pursue part-time church opportunities. 

        I for one think we need to continue renewing our campus ministry programs. Jack’s idea of small, low-cost, worshiping “grants” would be ideal for establishing a worshiping community on a college campus. It would require lots of imagination and creative problem-solving, but I think it would be an excellent challenge.

        • David  

          I agree, it was my choice to go to school but in a Reformed sense it was not done alone. I received my call to ministry through the context of my local church and it was affirmed by the larger presbytery. We are responsible to them, we need to answer their committee’s questions, pass their exams,  and fill out their mandatory internships. Why are they adding to the burden without taking on some of it themselves?

    • Brekke El  

       I feel you brother! CPE is a problematic system. I’m in the same boat (except at a hospice this summer). Blessings.

  • Pingback: [BLOCKED BY STBV] My 2012 New Year’s Resolutions

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  • Bruce Reyes-Chow  

    No prob . . . right on that!

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